England and Wales

C&HCardiff10

Set the controls for the heart of Torchwood! Tickets are now available for the first ever Collings & Herring Live Podcast in Wales: Cardiff St David’s Hall, January 21, 2010. It’s a full evening of adult entertainment, with podcast, stand-up, Q&A etc.

C&H100listing

The other two key dates for your diary:

TUESDAY December 8, 2009
Duke Of York’s Picturehouse, Brighton
The Collings & Herrin Christmas Podcast Party: an evening of stand-up, interaction, prizes, secret dancing, an exclusive Q&A, the chance to pick up a perfect Christmas gift and, of course, the one hour, 6 minute and 35 second podcast itself. After May’s near sell-out, we hope to repeat the feat, and celebrate the birth of the baby Jesus a couple of weeks early. With you. Tickets available here.

MONDAY February 1, 2010
Leicester Square Theatre, London
The 100th Collings & Herrin Podcast
: the 100th C&H podcast, seasonally adjusted, recorded in front of a baying audience of nerds, 7.00-8.30 then you can buy us a drink somewhere quiet. Tickets already available here.

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15 thoughts on “England and Wales

  1. "it's a full evening of adult entertainment"Sounds like a live sex show. Did Mr Herrin get his wish? Has Collings finally given in to the inevitable?!

  2. No Wonder I still get confused (ala Adam And joe), you still say "Collings and Herring" and you're in it. How are mere mortals how to get it right.. Set an example Collinz 🙂

  3. Much as I enjoy the podcasts I miss your old-school blogs Andrew. Every post now seems to be a C&H plug of some sort. Even the first half of the podcast itself is like a very long Pearl & Dean-style list of forthcoming attractions! Anyway, glad it's doing well and i'm still listening and enjoying. Cheers, Keran.

  4. Keran, I've been so busy of late I haven't had time to write considered blog entries. I need to meaningfully review Seasons 3 and 4 of Battlestar Galactica, but I seriously haven't had the time to concentrate on such luxuries. The C&H entries are quick to do, and we need to drum up support for our paying enterprises as we do so much for free – quite difficult to justify that to our accountants, but the gigs help to bridge the gap and mean we can carry on with the free podcasts, which we fully intend to do.This is a recession. If I have any time to spare between free stuff, I really need to work to fill it. The blog is a luxury for when I have time not filled with work. I hope you will continue to be patient.

  5. Maybe it's a fault on my computer, or I'm just stupid, but I found it impossible to book online for the Brighton podcast and had to do it via the phone. Thisjust might put off potential punters who prefer to book online only, so thought I'd point it out. Maybe worth testing out your end! Anyway looking forward .. best,Kathryn

  6. I often say no to work if it means working unsociable hours, or if it is based upon the assumption that yes, I'll do it, because I simply must be on the radio or TV. I don't feel that way. One BBC radio programme has been after me for two days to appear on a discussion about something I consider to be entirely trivial. I am not inclined to do it. I'm sure the appearance fee would be minimal, and although I like the programme in question, I don't need to be on it. I'm happy for others to discuss things on it, and I'll listen to them – unless it's a burning issue that I have something profound to add to, of course.I know I have the image of someone who's on the telly a lot, but as I've said before, if I said yes to everything, I'd be on a whole lot more than I am. I'd rather not work at weekends, or in the evenings. Gigs are different, as they are by their nature an evening thing. And I'll do Michael Ball's programme once a month, because it's once a month, and I like Michael Ball and the people who work on the programme and at least Radio 2 gets an audience. But early mornings and after 7pm are also a no, as a rule. I have my boundaries. That said, if you're not working, you're not earning. And I never assume the phone will ring. Sometimes you have to pitch, and be proactive. And I do a lot of pitching on spec, with no guarantee of any money at the other end of it. It's the nature of the game. But at least if I'm writing on spec, I can do so within working hours. I won't write at night. Sorry, that was a long answer!

  7. Keran, I hope you enjoy the old-school blog entry I have written about the film The White Ribbon. Also, apologies for Richard's reaction to your entirely reasonable comment on today's podcast. You know what he's like.

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